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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
to death in virginia. >> teresa lewis' case gained international attention not only because of her gender. also activists argued she lacked the intelligence to mastermind the crime. jim sciutto now reports from virginia's death row. >> reporter: teresa lewis has confessed to a cold and calculating crime. asking her lover and a friend to kill her husband and stepson, to collect a $250,000 life insurance policy. in a jail house interview with cnn, she pled for forgiveness. >> i wsh i could take it back. and i'm sorry for all the people that i've hurt. >> reporter: but complicating the case, lewis did not pull the trigger. the men who did only got life in prison. and crucially, court-appointed doctors found she only has an iq of 72. just 2 points above the legal minimum for execution in virginia. a duke university psychologist who examined her for the defense concluded, teresa's functional mental age is in the range of 12 to 14 years. rallying to her cause are novelist john grisham, justices sonia sotomayor and ruth bader ginsburg, who voted to stay her execution. and thousands on the web. f
to death last night in virginia. teresa lewis had been convicted for arranging the murders of her for arraracng the murders of her activists argued lewis was not net intelligent enough to carry out the plot. in her last words lewis apologized for the crime. >>> president obama has private meetings with world leaders in new york today as his u.n. visit wraps up. >> the president focused on the mideast during a major address yesterday. another speaker made remarks so controversial some people left the room. t.j. winick has more from the u.n. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the morning session here at the united nations really belonged to president obama, who spoke about his hopes for mideast peace. the afternoon session belonged to iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad, who also spoke about peace but struck a much fern president just weeks after the administration relaunched direct talks between the two sides. >> if an agreement is not reached, palestinians will never know the pride and dignity that comes with their own state. israelis will never know t
anywhere in the carolinas or virginia as needed. meanwhile, in massachusetts, fema's teams are very busy there too ahead of the storm. >>> national guard crews were at the ready in north carolina ahead of the storm's arrival. last-minute checks were done to a giant hoist that could lift about 600 pounds. on top of that, blackhawk crews made sure their helicopters were prepared to fly. >> despite the warnings two sailors in charleston, south carolina, decided to try their luck against earl. not a good idea. the two men had to jump out just before a huge wave smashed their craft against the pilings. they were not hurt. >>> of course our coverage of hurricane earl does not end here. later this half hour, much more from the north carolina coast. later on "america this morning" and "good morning america," more live reports all on the storm. >>> and turning to other news on this friday morning, the army has lost its first chaplain in combat since the vietnam war. 43-year-old captain dale getts was among five americans killed by a roadside bomb on monday. he died after the supply convoy he was
is reaching a less than glowing end. this week, ge is shuttering this plant in winchester, virginia, its last u.s. factory producing plain old incandescent lightbulbs. new energy standards will all but ban the bulbs over the next four years, forcing millions to switch to compact fluorescents, most of which are made overseas. seems the invention that thomas edison perfected 130 years ago is flickering and fading. >> this is edison's private experimental room at the laboratory. one of the things he was working on a lot in the late 1880s and early 1890s were ways of improving the electric lamp. >> reporter: paul israel says the great inventor would be torn about the change. >> on the one hand, he would have been disappointed. on the other hand, one of the things he was very interested in was the more efficient ways to generate electricity. so he would have seen that as the future. >> reporter: the incandescent bulb might be edison's most important innovation. notorious for getting by on a few hours' sleep, he wanted to transform the world into a 24-hour culture by lighting up the night. but the
with the latest. >> reporter: later today, president obama heads to northern virginia to mark the six-month anniversary of the health care reform law, hailing some of the new protections that take effect this week. 4-year-old myra rakers' life will change this thursday in ways she's probably too young to understand. >> in the next couple of days, the most sweeping set of consumer protections go into law. >> reporter: protections like a ban on insurance companies imposing a lifetime limit on essential health benefits. just four years into her life, myra has had a kidney transplant and already hit her $500,000 lifetime coverage cap. >> they won't pay the claims. >> reporter: come september 23rd the insurance companies won't have a choice. >> just a huge weight has been lifted off of our shoulders. >> reporter: insurers will no longer be allowed to deny coverage to children even if they have pre-existing conditions, or stop providing coverage to customers because of technical errors on past applications. of course, these consumer protections don't come without a cost. >> impact is likely
this plant in winchester, virginia, its last u.s. factory producing plain old incandescent lightbulbs. new energy standards will all but ban the bulbs over the next four years, forcing millions to switch to compact fluorescents. most of which are made overseas. seems the invention that thomas edison perfected 130 years ago is flickering and fading. >> this is edison's private experimental room at the laboratory. one of the things he was working on a lot in the late 1880s and early 1890s were ways of improving the electric lamp. >> reporter: edison historian paul israel says the great inventor would be torn about the change. >> on the one hand, he would have been disappointed. on the other hand, edison was always somebody kind of looking forward. one of the things he was always very interested in was more efficient ways to generate electricity. so he would have seen that as the future. >> reporter: the incandescent bulb might be edison's most important innovation. notorious for getting by on a few hours' sleep, he wanted to transform the world into a 24-hour culture by lighting up the night
. long is the pastor at new birth missionary ban tigs church. >>> the way is clear for virginia to carry out its first execution of a woman in nearly a century. the supreme court has now refused to block tomorrow's scheduled lethal injection of teresa lewis. she was convicted of hiring two men to kill her husband and stepson back in 2002. her attorney had argued lewis' borderline mentally challenged and because of that she should be spared. >>> at least one republican congressional candidate does not want campaign support from sarah palin. jeffrey perry from massachusetts is dismissing palin, calling her an entertainer. you can expect to see palin and two democratic heavyweights on the campaign trail, as john hendren reports. >> reporter: it's a battle of political titans. in the republicans' corner, sarah palin. >> i wouldn't go that far. >> reporter: in the other corner, a democratible dream team. former president bill clinton and first lady michelle obama. >> take care, thank you. >> reporter: the first lady's travel schedule is a map of endangered democrats. wisconsin for russ feingo
state takes on number ten virginia tech 8:00 eastern time on our sister network espn news. i'll take boise state. my good friend brian murphy's a reporter in idaho covering that scene. hope he has a good season. >> a lot of people saying they're overrated. >> we'll see, we'll see. >>> finally this half hour, the drama hitting a sour note on "american idol." rob, typically it's the people in front of the judges' desk getting the boot from the show. >> not this time around. the controversy behind the desk this year is leading to a big shakeup. who's in and who's out? here's jeremy hubbard. >> reporter: with season ten auditions already under way, it is down to the wire. can "american idol" find the right new judges to stop a ratings slide? >> this is a wakeup call time for "american idol." the ratings went down approximately 5 million this year. they cannot lose another 5 million next season. it's a perfect time for the judge panel to be shaken up. >> reporter: sash ray dequartereddy's departure had been rumored for week. with everyone from justin timberlake to elton john on the wish l
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)